UK – London – Palace Theatre

Dates: 31 January 1891 – present

Seating Capacity: 1400 (on 4 levels)
Owner: Nimax Theatres (Palace Theatre website)
Originally named the Royal English Opera House. 

Until the phenomenal sell-out success of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, the theatre had two seats permanently bolted open so the theatre ghosts always had somewhere to sit. These seats were not usuable by the public.
There are two ghosts in residence – an unknown ballerina (who has been known to pirouette across the stage) and the famous actor Ivor Novello, who apparently watches performances from the magnificent Dress Circle.

Harry Potter make-over planning permission (The Stage, 27 May 2016)

Selected Past Productions

  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (30 July 2016 – )
  • The Commitments (August 2013 – November 2015)
  • Singin’ in the Rain (February 2012 – June 2013)
  • Priscilla Queen of the Desert (March 2009 – December 2011)
  • Monty Python’s Spamalot (30 September 2006 – 3 January 2009)
  • Whistle Down The Wind (March 2006 – August 2006)
  • The Woman in White (September 2004 – February 2006)
  • Les Miserables (4 December 1985 – April 2004)
  • On Your Toes (June 1984 – ?November 1985)
  • The Palace Theatre was purchased by Really Useful Theatre Company on August 23 1983.
  • Refurbishment work after Song and Dance closed, under the ownership of Really Useful:
    • Remove old formica-covered box office
    • Install kitchen next to Stalls Bar
    • Remove merchandising counter from foyer
    • Return artwork by Fairfax Murray “The Concert” to it’s original position
    • Reveal marble in the Dress Circle bar & base of marble around the proscenium
  • Song and Dance (March 26th 1982 – March 1984, 795 performances)
  • Jesus Christ Superstar (Previews from July 29 1972, Opened August 9 1973, Closed 23 August 1980 after 3358 performances)
  • Danny at the Palace (1970 – 1972) featuring Danny La Rue
  • Cabaret (1968)
  • The Sound of Music (Opened 18 May 1961: 2385 performances)
  • Flower Drum Song (from March 24, 1960: 464 performances)
  • Where’s Charley (from 20 February 1958: 404 performances)
  • The Entertainer (September 1957)
  • King’s Rhapsody (from 15 September 1949: 841 performances)
  • Song of Norway (1946)
  • Under Your Hat (1939 – 1940)
  • On Your Toes (1937)
  • Anything Goes (1935)
  • Gay Divorce (1933)
  • The Girl Friend (1927)
  • Princess Charming (1926 – 326 performances)
  • No, No Nanette (11 March 1925 – 665 performances)
  • First Royal Command Variety Performance in 1912
  • 1910 – London debut of the ballerina Pavlova
  • The planned operatic programme didn’t succeed as planned, and the building was reopened as the “Palace Theatre of Variety” on December 10th 1892
  • Ivanhoe by Arthur Sullivan was the opening production in Richard D’Oyly Carte’s “Royal English Opera House” (31 January 1891, for 155 performances)

Staff

Chief Engineer was Eric Willett 

Equipment

The Stage Guide, 1971
Electrics; Strand CD TH 1 on SR gantry. Dimmers – 120 (1k to 2kW); no presets; groups – 14 memory pistons. Circuits – FOH 32; Flies 62; Stage dips 26. Total capacity available – 300A on 3 phases. Special effects supply – 60A on 3 phases. Follow spots – 2 sunspots.

Archive equipment related to Palace Theatre, London over the years

  • CD / System CD (Strand)
  • Grand Master Board (Strand)
  • Documents

    Main Desk at the Palace Theatre.
    Main Desk at the Palace Theatre.  
    Click on thumbnail to enlarge
    [528kb  JPEG]
    From John Gray Photo Collection

    Palace Theatre - Arthur Lloyd 
    [External Website]
    From Arthur Lloyd website

    LSI - Into the Woods (November 1990)
    [763kb PDF]
    From Lighting & Sound International

    The Woman in White (November 2004)
    [2.08Mb PDF]
    From Lighting & Sound International

    LSI - Singin in the Rain (March 2012)
    [467kb PDF]
    From Lighting & Sound International

    Mentions of Palace Theatre, London in indexed journals

    Exhibits in the Backstage Heritage Collection

  • System CD 120 Channel
  • Location


    View in Google Maps