UK – London – Duke of York’s Theatre

Dates: 1892 – present

Arthur Earnshaw was a theatre electrician here when he founded Strand Electric with Phillip Sheridan in 1914. 

Official website: http://www.atgtickets.com/venues/duke-of-yorks/

Owned by Ambassadors Theatre Group (ATG)

Floods

The theatre has twice suffered from flooding and had to cancel shows.

History (from official website)

The theatre, which opened on 10 September 1892 with Wedding Eve, was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte. Initially called the Trafalgar Square, the name was shortened to Trafalgar in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York’s to honour the future King George V. In 1900, Jerome K Jerome’s Miss Hobbs was staged as well as David Belasco’s Madame Butterfly, which was seen by Puccini, who later turned it into what is probably his most famous opera; it was ultimately performed at the Duke of York’s in 1932 by the Carl Rosa Opera Company.
The 1930s brought a number of interesting seasons, amongst them, Grand Guignol, The Ballet Rambert and the notable appearances of Markova and Dolin which greatly helped to popularise ballet in England. In the late 1970s the freehold of the theatre was purchased by Capital Radio and it closed in 1979 for refurbishment. It reopened in February 1980 and the first production under the aegis of Capital Radio was Rose, starring Glenda Jackson. Other successes include Al Pacino’s award-winning performance in David Mamet’s American Buffalo, Richard Harris’ comedy Stepping Out, directed by Julia Mackenzie and Willy Russell’s Shirley Valentine.

Past Productions (some from http://www.dukeofyorkstheatre.co.uk)

  • Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour (7 June 2017 – 2 September 2017)
  • The Dresser (5 October 2016 – 14 January 2017)
  • How the Other Half Loves (Wed 03 August 2016 – Sat 01 October 2016)
  • ?
  • Jeeves and Wooster: Perfect Nonsense (October 30th 2013 – 20 September 2014)
  • A Doll’s House (8 August 2013 – 26 October 2013)
  • Passion Play (7 May 2013 – 3 August 2013) by Peter Nichols, starring Zoë Wanamaker
  • The Judas Kiss (17 January 2013 – 6 April 2013) by David Hare, starring Rupert Everett and Freddie Fox
  • Constellations (16 November 2012 – 5 January 2013) by Nick Payne
  • Jumpy (28 August 2012 – 3 November 2012) by April de Angelis, starring Tamsin Greig
  • Backbeat (10 October 2011 – 18 February 2012), co-written by Iain Softley and Stephen Jeffreys
  • Journey’s End (19 July 2011 – 3 September 2011) by RC Sherriff, directed by David Grindley
  • Speaking in Tongues (18 September 2009 – 12 December 2009) by Andrew Bovell starring John Simm
  • Arcadia (27 May 2009 – 12 September 2009) by Tom Stoppard
  • No Man’s Land (7 October 2008 – 3 January 2009) by HaroldPinter, starring Michael Gambon, David Walliams, David Bradley and Nick Dunning
  • Under the Blue Sky (25 July 2008 – 20 September 2008) by David Eldridge, starring Catherine Tate, Francesca Annis and Dominic Rowan
  • That Face (1 May 2008 – 5 July 2008) by Polly Stenham, starring Lindsay Duncan, Hannah Murray and Matt Smith
  • Rent Remixed (16 October 2007 – 2 February 2008), by Jonathan Larson, starring Denise Van Outen (succeeded 24 December 2007 by Jessie Wallace)
  • In Celebration (5 July 2007 – 15 September 2007 ) by David Storey, starring Orlando Bloom, Tim Healy, Lynda Baron, Gareth Farr, Paul Hilton, Ciaran McIntyre and Dearblah Malloy
  • Little Shop of Horrors (12 March 2007 – 23 June 2007) by Alan Menken, starring Sheridan Smith, Paul Keating and Alistair McGowan
  • Rock ‘n’ Roll (22 July 2006 – 24 February 2007) by Tom Stoppard, starring David Calder, Emma Fielding, Dominic West, Rufus Sewell, and Nicola Bryant
  • Embers (1 March 2006 – 24 June 2006) by Sandor Marai, adapted by Christopher Hampton, starring Jeremy Irons and Patrick Malahide
  • Journey’s End (5 October 2004 – 19 February 2005) by R.C. Sherriff
  • Hedda Gabler – starring Eve Best
  • The Dresser –  starring Nicholas Lyndhurst and Julian Glover
  • Dirty Blonde (16 June 2004 – 28 August 2004) by Claudia Shear
  • The Holy Terror ()
  • Calico ()
  • Sweet Panic ()
  • After Mrs Rochester (22 July 2003 – 25 October 2003) by Polly Teale – Shared Experience production
  • Stones In His Pockets (2001)
  • The Weir – ran for 2 years & won 1999 Olivier Award for Best New Play
  • Shirley Valentine (1989/1990 – transfer from the Vaudeville Theatre)
  • Stepping Out ()
  • American Buffalo ()
  • Grand Guignol (1930s)
  • Wedding Eve (10 September 1892)

Archive equipment related to Duke of York's Theatre over the years

  • Grand Master Board (Strand Lighting)
  • Documents


    Duke Of Yorks Theatre - Arthur Lloyd 
    [External Website]
    From Arthur Lloyd website

    Location


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